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ESL forum > Ask for help > vocabulary question    

vocabulary question



Pedro14
Spain

vocabulary question
 
Hi all!
 
First of all happy new year to all members of this community! Once again I badly need your help. Today in class we have spoken about the benefits and downsides of online shopping and going to a shop. One student uttered the following sentence: "I prefer buying online to going to a physical shop because..."  In my view physical shop is not correct, but I wonder how could this idea be expressed. The other expression for which I didn īt have an answer - and I īve looked up some online dictionaries- is as follows: my students was writing a concert review and wanted to convey that thanks to the music style which was being played and the good lyrics of the songs and the vibe of the concert he was in his own world. He took no notice of any problems - the venue being packed, his girlfriend moaning about her hurting feet,...- In Spanish there is a colloquial expression to describe the person who takes no notice to anything and always does his own things. Is there an equivalent in English? Thanks.

10 Jan 2017      



ldeloresmoore
China

You know, this is such a new evolution in English that I īm not sure proper vocabulary has evolved fast enough to accurately describe it. 
 
As a native speaker, I īd probably say " I prefer buying online to going out to shop...." or "I prefer a online shop to a brick-and-mortar shop" ------
 
The the first example, I use two activities BUYING ONLINE and GOING OUT TO SHOP.  So, in both halves of the sentence, the grammar is the same.
 
In the second example, I use two nouns -- ONLINE SHOP and BRICK-AND-MORTAR shop.  Again, for the same reason.
 
(Brick-and-mortar is another way to refer to a business that is in a building)  

10 Jan 2017     



ldeloresmoore
China

Concerning your Spanish question --- is the Spanish term a noun or adjective?  

10 Jan 2017     



Apodo
Australia

Physical shop sounds ok to me.
Another way would  be an actual shop. 
 
We use he īs in a world of his own. He was transported by the music.
He was oblivious to his surroundings.
 

10 Jan 2017     



leaponover
United States

Physical shop is fine.
 
Other options:
 
store front
brick-and-mortar (this seems to be the most popular imo) - People compare online stores to brick and mortar stores.  This is the one I would teach in comparing between online and the latter. 

Hereīs some more information as well 

10 Jan 2017     



Jayho
Australia

I would say physical shop, too. It is perfectly natural to me.
 
Sometimes, our stores refer to their modes of purchasing as online and in-store & online and in-person.
 
He was engrossed in the music (or, as some people commonly say, totally/completely engrossed)

10 Jan 2017     



JOHNPALMER
United Kingdom

to an īactual ī shop or īreal ī shop would be my suggestion. Or you could mention where; a high Street shop or shopping centre

11 Jan 2017     



ldeloresmoore
China

I would add, also, that "high street" is probably only going to make sense in a British context. 
 
I īm American, and I heard references to "high street shops" for months before I realized that it was a reference to the type of shop and not the name of the street.  

11 Jan 2017     



FrauSue
France

Yep, physical shop sounds fine to me too. I īd probably use actual shop in an actual conversation!
 
I agree with apodo īs suggestions for your second question.

11 Jan 2017     



lolain
Spain


I think physical shop sounds just fine. As to the second qestion, perhaps" he was so taken in by the music"?

11 Jan 2017     



Apodo
Australia

I wouldn īt use ītaken in by" about music.
 
This phrase has other meanings:
 
She was taken in by the scam email. (deceived)
 
The orphan was taken in by a kind aunt. (given somewhere to live)
 
 
 

12 Jan 2017     

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