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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > Call on someone - usage    

Call on someone - usage



Gi2gi
Georgia

Call on someone - usage
 
I compiled a list of phrasal verbs a while ago, which included "call on someone" meaning to "visit someone".
 
The example I gave for the verb is:
 
 "We called on you last night but you weren īt home."
 
A native speaker  commented on a FB group that the example sounds unnatural and the verb wouldn īt be used in this way.
 
I would love to hear your comments, does the example sound "unnatural" to your native ears?
 
Cheers,
 
Giorgi 

25 Jan 2018      



alexanderelwood@hotmail.com
United Kingdom

I have to disagree with the FB User, I would definitely say this - and have.

25 Jan 2018     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

Hello dear Giorgi. It īs fine. To īcall on ī is to īdrop by ī - is that more American? - just go round and take your chances on whether someone is in. In my neck of the woods, we are more likely to say īcall round ī. īCall round any time! ī When I was a nipper, back in the Dark Ages, we used to īcall for ī each other, and that was literal. You would stand outside your friend īs house and call their name until they came out. And I guess that is the derivation of the phrase. 

25 Jan 2018     



Jayho
Australia

It īs a bit formal, but it īs fine. Dropped by is the informal version.

25 Jan 2018     



redcamarocruiser
United States

To me “call on” means to choose a student to respond to a question in the classroom. But it would be understood contextually, how you meant it. Maybe it is only not common in the US, since the colleagues ī flags are not American.

25 Jan 2018     



douglas
United States

It īs a BE - AE thing.
 
In BE "call-on" is a pretty common way to say "visit", it īs much rarer in AE (but used sometimes).
 
In AE "call-on" is usually  what the teacher does in the classroom when s/he wants you to provide your input to the current subject.
 

26 Jan 2018     



Gi2gi
Georgia

Thank you, dear colleagues,your helpful comments are much appreciated.

26 Jan 2018     



redcamarocruiser
United States

Great explanation, Douglas. 

26 Jan 2018