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ESL forum > Ask for help > go off track    

go off track



rosanaingles
Spain

go off track
 
Hello!
 
Can you help me with this expression? Does go off track has the same meaning as lose track when you are talking about conversations?
 
Thanks in advance.
 
 
 

28 Feb 2018      



chalkovic
United States

My understanding is that in conversation, "go off track" means to get off the original topic, while "lose track" means to forget something or to forget where in the conversation you are.
Hope this helps. 

28 Feb 2018     



rosanaingles
Spain

ok, so go off track means changing the subject/topic of the conversation, doesn t it?

28 Feb 2018     



yanogator
United States

Yes, Rosana, it means to change the subject, but not intentionally.
 
I don t like talking to her because the conversation goes on fine for a while, then she goes off track and the subject could be anything after five minutes.
 
Bruce 

28 Feb 2018     



Zora
Canada

When you go off track, you are basically diverging from the original topic - usually because you suddenly remember something, are distracted and start talking about something related to the topic but actually has nothing to do with it. I d say that it is similar to the Spanish phrase "perder el hilo".
 
Lose track  that would be similar to "perder la cuenta". If that helps?
 
Cheers! 
 
 

28 Feb 2018     



rosanaingles
Spain

Understood!
 
Thanks for your answers 

1 Mar 2018     



redcamarocruiser
United States

You can also say " get off track" for conversations that diverge from the topic. Students sometimes like to get the  conversation off track.

2 Mar 2018