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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > Choose     

Choose



normandey
Egypt

Choose
 
I ----------- buy some souvenirs for my family while I ´m in London next week. a) need to ___ b) must ___ c) have to

15 May 2018      



Lulu98123
Poland

It depends form the context. You can use ´need to ´ when this action is necessery for you. Of course ´must ´also express obligation or necessity, but there is a difference between them. ´ have to ´ tells that is something that you want to do and it ´s your choice, e.g. you think that ´s good and nice to buy something for your family But ´must ´ is impersonal, when someone from ´outside ´ wants you to do something. In this case it would mean that you should buy some souvenirs becauae someone, maybe from your family, told you to do this

15 May 2018     



jannabanna
France

As a Brit, I would have put "must" in this sentence: I must buy some souvenirs for my family while I ´m in London next week.  (meaning - I really should!!)  The speaker is giving himself an obligation.  But it can also be used to insist on something to someone else, as in this sentence:
"You must see that film, it ´s fantastic!  - The speaker thinks it would be an excellent thing for you to do!  
 
We also use "must" as a noun in the same way:  The Colosseum is a must if you visit Rome.
 
Hope that sounds clear to you!

16 May 2018     



Lulu98123
Poland

Thanks for complement :)

16 May 2018     



satodude
Brazil

need and must imply a consequence, usually a negative one.

16 May 2018