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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > Help with some expressions, please    

Help with some expressions, please



Minka
Slovenia

Help with some expressions, please
 
hello there!
 
I hope to get some feedback from native speakers. 
I am supposed to translate an abstract into English and I am not sure about certain words:
 
What is the best term for the teacher who teaches drama in a middle/secondary school. The children take part in it from their own interest, it is optional. 
 
Does the teacher of the school drama club sound ok? 
Originally the word was mentor, someone suggested it should be tutor.  
Is there another expression for the drama club? 
 
Thank you a lot.
 
Minka 
 
 

13 Sep 2018      



cunliffe
United Kingdom

In the UK, Drama is often on the curriculum at Key Stage 3 , (ages 11-14,) but not always. Then students can choose to take it as a GCSE option (ages 14 -16). In these schools, the Drama teacher may do a lunchtime club, so indeed, he or she will be the teacher of the school drama club. In schools where there is no mainstream Drama, it ´s the same. A teacher - usually an English teacher, might well put on a drama club at lunchtime. It ´s just the same, s/he is the drama teacher, or s/he is the teacher of the drama club.
In a situation where there is no-one willing or qualified to teach Drama, but there are some students who want to take it, the school may buy in a few hours a week from a Drama tutor. ´Mentor ´ wouldn ´t do in this situation.  
 

13 Sep 2018     



Minka
Slovenia

Thank you so much! Mentor didn ´t sound right to me, either. I suppose tutor might be the best choice here, since it is really an extra-curriculum activity and the teacher didn ´t really study drama, but is willing to organize this. I hope I get it right. 
 
Thanks again, best wishes!
 
Minka 

13 Sep 2018     



yanogator
United States

Minka,
A tutor is a person who helps students, often one-on-one, with subjects they are having trouble with.
 
In the US, a teacher who is in charge of a club is called the club ´s Advisor.
 
Bruce 

13 Sep 2018     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

Yep, I agree with Bruce. If there is a large club, even if the organiser isn ´t qualified, I would call her the group ´s teacher. A tutor is for one to one, or small group tuition and usually a serious outcome is required - qualifications!            

14 Sep 2018     



ldthemagicman
United Kingdom

Dear Minka,

 

In my grand-children ´s school. they refer to the qualified teacher who teaches Drama as ´the Drama Teacher ´, and the qualified teacher who teaches music as ´the Music Teacher ´, both in school and in the after-hours Clubs.

 
When the qualified Drama Teacher was absent, but the Drama activities continued, they referred to the stand-in teacher as the   ´Teacher who takes Drama ´.
 
In my experience, ´a Tutor ´ is a qualified teacher. who, (usually one-to-one), helps, advises, encourages and often teaches a student a particular subject. Sometimes, the student seeks out a teacher for Private Tuition (teaching) before an exam, to improve the student ´s ability.
 
In my experience, a Mentor is a professional person, (a Nurse, for example), who is in charge of a Student Nurse. The Mentor explains procedures and ensures that the Student Nurse carries out all nursing duties correctly and safely.
 
Les Douglas 
 
 

14 Sep 2018