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ESL forum > Ask for help > rewrite sentence    

rewrite sentence



tommy1996
Vietnam

rewrite sentence
 
Please help me with the sentence:( what conditional do we have to use?)
He s tired beause he works hard all the time
If ................................................................... 
Thanks 

18 Mar 2017      



thuyanh_lg1
Hong Kong

If he didn t work hard all the time, he wouldn t be tired.-> conditional type 2

18 Mar 2017     



yanogator
United States

Or, to keep it positive, If he worked hard all the time, he would be tired.
 
Bruce 

18 Mar 2017     



...Alena...
Russian Federation

Just curious. Why can t third conditional type be used here?A peson is tired now, but if he hadn t woked hard, he wouldn t have been tired.

19 Mar 2017     



Gi2gi
Georgia

Because the original question deals with the situation in the present, while the third conditional is used for uneal situations in the past.

19 Mar 2017     



ldeloresmoore
China

Can I throw this in? --  I ve had some luck with this approach:
 
Zero Conditional --- true for everybody.     "If he (or someone) works all the time, he (or they)  won t have time for other things"
 
First  Conditional --- true for one person, but might be different for someone else.  
"If he s tired, it s because he works all the time."  (Another person might not be so tired) 
 
Second conditional -- possible, but not likely to happen.   "If he s not tired tomorrow, he will work 72 hours without stopping."  (Technically possible, but a 99% unlikely to happen.)
 
Third conditional -- way to talk about things in the past that DID NOT HAPPEN:
"If he had been tired at the end of the day, he would have slept longer the next morning."  (Was he tired at the end of the day? No.  Did he sleep longer the next morning? No)   

19 Mar 2017     



ldthemagicman
United Kingdom

Dear Tommy,

The sentence that we are given is: Hes tired because he works hard all the time.

If we were to use because as the conditional subordinator, (in other words, the subordinating conjunction), then the four Conditionals could be as follows, (or similar constructions):

Zero Conditional: Because he works hard all the time, he is tired. (FACT).

First Conditional: Because he works hard all the time, he will be tired. (REAL, POSSIBILE).

Second Conditional: Because he worked hard all the time, he would be tired. (UNREAL, IMPROBABLE, or IMPOSSIBLE).

Third Conditional: Because he had worked hard all the time, he would have been tired. (IN THE PAST, so TOTALLY UNREAL, TOTALLY IMPOSSIBLE).

If we reverse the two clauses, we have:

Zero Conditional: He is tired, because he works hard all the time. (FACT).

First Conditional: He will be tired, because he works hard all the time. (REAL, POSSIBILE).

Second Conditional: He would be tired, because he worked hard all the time. (UNREAL, IMPROBABLE, or IMPOSSIBLE).

Third Conditional: He would have been tired, because he had worked hard all the time. (IN THE PAST, so TOTALLY UNREAL, TOTALLY IMPOSSIBLE).

However, the sentence that we are given is: Hes tired because he works hard all the time.

Plus, the question indicates that we must begin the sentence with the word if.

I suggest that there are the 8 possible answers, (with these or similar constructions).

Zero Conditional: If hes tired, its because he works hard all the time. (FACT).

First Conditional: If he will be tired, its because he works hard all the time. (REAL, POSSIBILE).

Second Conditional: If he would be tired, its because he worked hard all the time. (UNREAL, IMPROBABLE, or IMPOSSIBLE).

Third Conditional: If he would have been tired, its because he had worked hard all the time. (IN THE PAST, so TOTALLY UNREAL, TOTALLY IMPOSSIBLE).

If we reverse the clauses:

Zero Conditional: If he works hard all the time hes tired. (FACT).

First Conditional: If he works hard all the time, he will be tired. (REAL, POSSIBILE).

Second Conditional: If he worked hard all the time, he would be tired. UNREAL, IMPROBABLE, or IMPOSSIBLE.

Third Conditional: If he had worked hard all the time he would have been tired. (IN THE PAST, so TOTALLY UNREAL, TOTALLY IMPOSSIBLE).

Some students think that we can begin Conditional Sentences using only the word, if.

This not so. Conditional sentences can also use:

After; As a consequence of; As a result of; As long as; As soon as; Assuming that; Because; Before; But for; Despite this; Even if; Given that (very formal); If only; In case; In order to; In the event of; In the event that; Just so that (informal); No matter how; Now that; On condition that; On the condition that; Once; Provided; Provided that; Providing that; Since; So long as; Supposing that; Therefore; Unless; Until; When; Whenever; Wherever; Whether or not; Yet, and some other constructions.

The sentence that we are given is: Hes tired because he works hard all the time.

The original question is in the Present Simple Tense, and it is Positive. It is also a Factual Statement, so, (in my opinion), it is a Zero Conditional. I suggest that possible answers are:

If hes tired, its because he works hard all the time.

By reversing the two clauses, (and re-wording), we can form:

If he works hard all the time, hes tired.

I hope that this helps you.

Les Douglas

20 Mar 2017     



yanogator
United States

Dee, your "second conditional" example is really an example of the first conditional. The second conditional uses the present conditional form of the verb (which many people mistake for the simple past). The example you gave tells what he will actually do, so it is a first conditional.
 
Bruce 

20 Mar 2017     



ldeloresmoore
China

Well, I had thought of that. And trying to stay within the confines of the sentence in question.  But all the guides I ve used here discuss situations where a sentence isn t quite either. (Mixed conditionals)   The focus is on the highly unlikely nature of it ---- and used that as the logic behind calling it second.    
 
But if I m wrong (neither first nor last time!  :-)   )  -- hopefully my heart is in the right place.  
 
 

20 Mar 2017     



yanogator
United States

 Yes, it s definitely highly unlikely that he will work 72 hours straight, but your sentence says that he will, and that is what determines the type.  Also, the form (If he is..., he will...) is first conditional. The second conditional shows its "unlikely" nature by using the conditional form of the verb (which looks like the simple past).
 
Bruce 

23 Mar 2017