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ESL forum > Ask for help > What s the extra word?    

What s the extra word?



ARaquelSP
Portugal

What s the extra word?
 
Dear teachers,

What is the extra word in the following sentence?

"It s a romance film set in the 1920 s"

I suppose it s film, but then I wonder if romance is only for books... In that case romance would be the extra word.

Thanks in advance!

14 Oct 2009      



libertybelle
United States

It all depends on how accurate you want your message to be. The adjective - romance is used to define what kind of film it is - so that would be the superfluous word.
If you left out film - then your reader might think it is a book or a love affair you are writing about.
Romance can be used to describe books, films and even a love affair!

L

14 Oct 2009     



ARaquelSP
Portugal

In that case I ll let film out, because in the whole, the example is: "Have you seen Susanna? It s a romance film set in the 1920 s". Maybe it works like "a thriller". We don t say "a thriller film", do we?

Thanks, libertybelle! Thumbs Up

14 Oct 2009     



libertybelle
United States

The word Romance or romantic is the extra word, not film.

If the sentence is, Have you seen Susanna? It s a film set in the 1920 s.

It would still be misleading - because it doesn t tell if it s a book or film.

15 Oct 2009     



ARaquelSP
Portugal

Hum... this is tricky. That s why I decided to ask for help here. Both words seem correct alone, but strange together... Maybe I ll just say that to students tomorrow.

Thanks for your help, libertybelle.

15 Oct 2009     



**********
Portugal

Raquel,
 
This is what I make of it:
 
 
Other meanings of romance (except for the one LL referred to) don t fit in here, because of the date.
 
So, I think the key word to the puzzle would be the verb set, more appropriate to refer to a film.

15 Oct 2009     



Zora
Canada

I d say the extra word is "film"...

It s like saying "It s a comedy film" - here "film" is the extra word...

15 Oct 2009     



ARaquelSP
Portugal

You mean that it s odd to say "... a romance set in the 1920 s.", Nika? 

15 Oct 2009     



Jayho
Australia

The use of the two words togther, as in romance film, is quite common.
 
Info here: 
 
 
 
Example:
 
Alexandra Pelosi, the daughter of Nancy Pelosi (Speaker of the House), will soon be adapting her documentary of George W. Bushs 2000 Presidential campaign into a fictional movie. Whats odd is that its going to be a romance film.   http://www.screenhead.com/reviews/george-w-bush-documentary-inspires-romance-film-what/
 
 
Cheers - Jayho

15 Oct 2009     



ballycastle1
United Kingdom

As it s not possible to see a book , I would say the superfluous word is film .

15 Oct 2009     



**********
Portugal

@ Ana, no I dont,
 
@ Jayho - You re right, Jayho, they can be put together, such as in romance film,  war film , sc-fic film;  however,  Ana asked about the extra word. So, we have to reason on selecting one or the other, I guess. This is how I understood Ana s request.
 
 
Edit1: if there is a word to be taken out, it would be romance (besides, other meanings of romance, such as a type of poetry and similar, or linguistical meaning dont fit so well with the time mentioned).
I think I understand the reason for your doubt, Ana. Are you thinking of romance considering its meaning in Portuguese? (for the other members, romance in Portuguese means novel)
 
Sorry, my IC went down and I had to repeat the whole thing.
 
Edit 2:Check other meanings of romance, please,  such as 3a &b,  6 and 7., referred to, here:
 
ij

15 Oct 2009     

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