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ESL forum > Ask for help > Difference between "under" & "below"    

Difference between "under" & "below"



flaviatl
Argentina

Difference between "under" & "below"
 
Hello everybody! Could you help me explain this difference?

I know how to use them but I find it hard to explain it to my stds.

30 Jun 2010      



teresapr
Portugal

http://www.oup.com/elt/catalogue/teachersites/oald7/lookup?cc=global-     This is a very useful online dictionary!It will help you!

30 Jun 2010     



franknbea
United Kingdom

Hi flaviatl

they are very similar and often used synonimously. one general point is under is  normally vertically beneath (the dog is under the table, or it īs right under your feet) and below can be merely at a lower elevation (the Dead Sea is below sea level)
i hope this helps

30 Jun 2010     



Olindalima ( F )
Portugal

Hi Flaviati

i don īt have a straight explanation, but I have the opposite. I think ,may be this is clear.
The opposite between  On  and ABOVE. ( just the opposite, upside wards )

I always tell my students:
Lay the dishes ON, ON ,. ON the table, never lay them ABOVE.
They will fly down to the ground ( or on the table ) and crash.

As far as ... under and below ...well...
let us say:
If you put your bag  UNDER a table, that īs ok. Now, ask someone to put his bag below yours.
IMPOSSIBLE.
Below your bag is the ground, so , no one can put there anything

Under means that something is in a lower level.

Below means something is in /on a  lower level than the one before.

LOL, I don īt think this was a fair explanation, I īm kind of tired, I know I was not that clear.

Do your best to understand me, I did my best to help you.
I īm in raggs
Kisses
l
Linda

1 Jul 2010     



Mar0919
Mexico

Under = physically beneath something... below = at a lower level or distance, mostly when the objects are in physical contact with another. Here are a few examples that might explain a little better the difference:
 
Under: the shoes are UNDER the bed / the cat is sleeping UNDER the table.
 
Below: the blackboard is BELOW the clock / the light switch is BELOW the map.
 
 
Hope this helped.
 
Mar

1 Jul 2010     



Mar0919
Mexico

Under = physically beneath something... below = at a lower level or distance, mostly when the objects are in physical contact with another. Here are a few examples that might explain a little better the difference:
 
Under: the shoes are UNDER the bed / the cat is sleeping UNDER the table.
 
Below: the blackboard is BELOW the clock / the light switch is BELOW the map.
 
 
Hope this helped.
 
Mar

1 Jul 2010     



Laly59
Spain

I agree with Mar0919 and examples are idoneous

1 Jul 2010     



rocio88
Argentina

Under is use when something is  physically beneath another thing
 
below when you are saying that something is at a lower level or distance, mostly when the objects are in physical contact with another
 
examples:
 
 
the cat is under the table
 
 
the fish is below the water (the fish is in physical contact with the water)
 
 
hope it helps you
 
kisses from argentina =)

1 Jul 2010     



sp.watson
Thailand

I agree with Rocio88 īs clear explanation that "under" is a preposition used to describe a more concrete physical relationship of objects in close proximity, e.g.
"I dropped my pencil, can you see it? Yes, there it is, under the desk."

In contrast  "below" is generally an indication of relative height or level, e.g.
"I live on the 25th floor, my friend lives on the floor below."

One caution though, there are idioms and phrases that use the words somewhat differently, e.g.
"I īm feeling under the weather today."
"She really got under my skin"
"How can I work under these circumstances"
"That was a good round of golf, I went round in 2 under par"

Have a good day.

1 Jul 2010     



flaviatl
Argentina

Thank you all!!!!!!!!!!
It īs much clearer now!!!!!!!!!

2 Jul 2010