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napster
Costa Rica

help me
 
Hi guys,How do you call person who is unable to speak "the handycap" thanks in advanced

15 Aug 2010      



Lina Ladybird
Germany

A handicapped person that cannot speak is "mute" or "dumb".

15 Aug 2010     



Apodo
Australia

It is not considered politically correct to use the word dumb as this word has connotations of low intelligence. You are dumb = you are stupid.
 
We used to say he is dumb she is deaf but now the preferred terms are a person with a hearing disability a person with a speech disabilility a person without speech
 
This is so we focus on the person and what they can do rather than the disability.

15 Aug 2010     



almaz
United Kingdom

I agree that the word dumb has pejorative connotations but think of our poor idioms: I was struck dumb by the sheer stupidity of it all or  I was struck with a speech disability by the sheer stupidity of it all ?

Also, there s some debate as to whether hearing impairment/disability can, in certain communities, actually be more offensive than the word deaf (see deaf culture , for example).

15 Aug 2010     



joy2bill
Australia

Oh dear... how difficult it is to stay politically correct.
 
I agree with Apodo. I would keep right away from calling anyone dumb .
 
We can t avoid the idioms other than to suggest that some such as the one quoted by Almez are rarely used in everyday speech anymore.
Also idioms are often used with absolutely little reference to their original meaning.
 
Words do change...just think of all those young girls called "Gay" and young boys called "Dick"
Cheers Joy

15 Aug 2010     



blunderbuster
Germany



I don t know anymore where I found this info, but "mute" is not politically correct anymore either, is it?

So, how would you actually say that someone is a "deaf-mute"? It is a person with passive and active communication disabilities? I mean, it is important to knwo what to say, disability is a topic in my curriculum.

15 Aug 2010     



Apodo
Australia

You re right BB.
Here s one link to suggested language to use.
 
 
Almaz: You are spot on with your comments about deaf culture.
Its hard to  be PC Confused

15 Aug 2010     



redcamarocruiser
United States

My neighbor s son was deaf and she used the term "deaf" when talking about him.

This conversation includes a comment by an audiologist and a deaf person.
http://nz.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080212065911AAd7ipu

Deaf is medically correct and will be understood. The label deaf is preferred by deaf people and is the official word in their national association, National Association of the Deaf, swo I would say it is politically correct.

The NAD is the nation s premier civil rights organization of, by and for deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the United States of America.

15 Aug 2010     



ballycastle1
United Kingdom

My youngest daughter has a hearing impairment but she never uses that term when speaing about herself.  She simply says I m deaf . The UK organisation for young people with hearing impairments is called The National Deaf Children s Society.  I don t know where this leaves you, napster.  Confused, I would think!

15 Aug 2010     



Jayho
Australia

Hi all
 
I think it depends on which country you are in and the terminology that your government currently uses.
 
Here in Australia the terminology does change from time to time.  I currently use the terms vision impaired and hearing impaired because this is what Centrelink, the welfare authority, uses.  I have to teach politically correct language to my business students and I usually refer them to websites such as this so they can see which terminology is in use as books can outdate quickly.
 
Here, mute and deaf and dumb disappeared decades ago.  Such a person is now referred to as visually and hearing impaired.
 
However, like redcamarocrusier said, vision impaired and hearing impaired people do generally refer to themselves as blind or deaf, as do the asssociations. 
 
Cheers
 
Jayho
 
P.S  Great link Apodo (and it comes from a nice part of our country)

15 Aug 2010     



Lina Ladybird
Germany

Let me cite Apodo:
We used to say he is dumb ... but now the preferred terms are ... a person with a speech disabilility a person without speech
 
And now Jayho:
Here, mute ... and dumb disappeared decades ago.  Such a person is now referred to as visually ... impaired
 
Thanks, guys, for letting me know about all that!! Thumbs Up
 
However, firstly, Ill throw my dictionary in the bin and secondly, Ill never ever use a certain online dictionary again! Angry 
 
None of the expressions you re actually using is mentioned in those dictionaries, but the ones I gave are not even labelled as "old-fashioned". Im aghast!
 
Oh dear... Just imagine me having a conversation and mentioning words like dumb or mute - if I did that, Id probably make a complete fool of myself!! How embarrassing that would be!! (Of course, I knew that "dumb" can also mean "stupid", but I thought it were still correct to use that "label" also for a person who cannot speak.)
 
PS: napster didnt ask about "deaf" people or "people with a hearing disability", just about a person who isnt able to speak... ;)
 

15 Aug 2010     

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