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ESL forum > Ask for help > to get on (well)    

to get on (well)



Entalio
Poland

to get on (well)
 
I haven t been here for so long. I need your help.
to get on means to have good relations.
we can say also to get on well and it still means the same.
Nevertheless how can I say not to have good relations?
Is there any phrasal or expression that sounds kind of same?
Thx in advance.

13 Jan 2011      



Kate (kkcat)
Russian Federation

to get on badly, not to get on well - are correct if I m not mistaken

:)

13 Jan 2011     



Entalio
Poland

I said so to my students. But unfortunately i think it s not correct. According to the dictionary to get on means to have smooth relations ( so it s like having good relations itself). Well is only the addition. So get on badly would not make a sense.. Am I right?

13 Jan 2011     



Entalio
Poland

I said so to my students. But unfortunately i think it s not correct. According to the dictionary to get on means to have smooth relations ( so it s like having good relations itself). Well is only the addition. So get on badly would not make a sense.. Am I right?

13 Jan 2011     



MoodyMoody
United States

This is slightly off-topic, but not too much. In the USA, we say "get along with" or "don t get along with" to mean having good or bad relationships with people. On our side of the pond, "get on with" something means to hurry up and do it already.

13 Jan 2011     



Entalio
Poland

I said so to my students. But unfortunately i think it s not correct. According to the dictionary to get on means to have smooth relations ( so it s like having good relations itself). Well is only the addition. So get on badly would not make a sense.. Am I right?

13 Jan 2011     



Entalio
Poland

I said so to my students. But unfortunately i think it s not correct. According to the dictionary to get on means to have smooth relations ( so it s like having good relations itself). Well is only the addition. So get on badly would not make a sense.. Am I right?

13 Jan 2011     



Kate (kkcat)
Russian Federation

I would then say : we don t get on/along ...that would make it a perfectly correct phrase. 

13 Jan 2011     



ballycastle1
United Kingdom

In the UK, we use  They don t get along, They don t get on and  They don t get on very well.

14 Jan 2011     



Apodo
Australia

This is how I use this phrase:
 
Get on with your work!  = Do your work now instead of talking etc.
Sorry, I can t talk now I have to get on with marking these tests.
 
He gets on very well with his mother-in-law.
 
He doesn t get on with his mother-in-law, so he doesn t like it when she visits.
 
He and his brother don t get on very well.
 
They get on really well together.
 
She is hard to get along with because she argues all the time.

14 Jan 2011     



douglas
United States

I feeling tells me:
 
doesn t get on (too) well with..  (definitely not a US English though)
 
but I can t support it.

14 Jan 2011     

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