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ESL forum > Ask for help > Need help from native speakers, please: "noddy dogs"    

Need help from native speakers, please: "noddy dogs"



magneto
Greece

Need help from native speakers, please: "noddy dogs"
 
Hello everyone!

Hope you īre all doing fine!

I need some help... And I īm guessing this is a question only a native speaker could answer, as I couldn īt find any definitions - not even in various online dictionaries ( including some of colloquial expressions).

Does anyone know what a noddy dog is? I īve found this and this picture on the net, but I was wondering if these toys have any special features that would make someone want to buy them online or if the term has another meaning as well, as I īve found it used in the following sentence: "Last year, fewer people bought key rings and noddy dogs over the Internet..."

Thank you in advance for your helpSmile

Have a great day/ evening!

10 Mar 2011      



monicap_87
El Salvador

Hi Magneto

I īm not a native speaker, but I guess I can help

Noddy dogs are sort of toys you can place on the board of your car. The head of these dogs is kind of loose, so whenever the car is in movement its head īnods ī here you can see an example. I have also see them in offices, and people have to tap them a bit on the head, so they nod (of course). They are mere decoration and they can also be found in other shapes.

They are called īnoddy ī because they seem to nod when their head is moved.

Hope this helps!

10 Mar 2011     



euflorinas
Greece


10 Mar 2011     



edrodmedina
United States

We call those bobble heads. They have all kinds, celeberties, animals (they sometimes can be the same, huh?) As you can see they can be of almost anything or anybody. Justin Beiber is hot right now, so I imagine heīs got a bobble head that is very collectible. Ones that were made a while back and arenīt in circulation become valuable depending on what or who they represent. Elvis, The Beatles, Marilyn, are probably hot sellers all the time.

10 Mar 2011     



blunderbuster
Germany

Yo quiero Taco Bell ;o) They used one of them in their commercials, about 10 years ago.... Typical 70s car accessory. 

10 Mar 2011     



magneto
Greece

Oh, I see...Yes, they sell them here, too.
I just got confused because I couldn īt understand why someone would buy such things online...But, 1. Ed īs comment about collectible ones made that  clear and 2. the sentence did state that people also order key rings from the net, so I guess it īs a collector īs thing...

Thank you all for answering!

Enjoy your day/ eveningSmile

10 Mar 2011     



SallyRB
United Kingdom

Theyīre called "nodding dogs" not noddy dogs!

10 Mar 2011     



magneto
Greece

Well, I did find pictures of them under both nodding dogs and noddy dogs. I don īt know which term is more common among native speakers, though...That īs up to you to tell...After all, they do call them bobble heads in the U.S. (see Ed īs post above)...Isn īt it amazing how many different terms can be used for the same thing?Smile

10 Mar 2011     



almaz
United Kingdom

Interestingly, īnoddies ī are also reaction shots which are used in televised interviews. Some years ago, I was interviewed in a pub (no typecasting intended), and the TV reporter was then filmed separately asking the same questions but nodding vigorously at the non-existent answers. 
The actual interview which was shown on TV suggested a smooth professional process with none of the "could you ask that a******e over there to shut the f*** up!" etc which punctuated the conversation in reality.

Fascinating, eh?

10 Mar 2011     



magneto
Greece

Yep!...Fascinating, indeed!

Thank you, Almaz, for adding a new word to our range of vocabulary- and a story to spice up our classes! Approve... Students usually like "today īs irrelevant piece of info", as I call it. 

10 Mar 2011