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ESL forum > Ask for help > How do we express this idea in english?    

How do we express this idea in english?



chenchen_castrourdiales
Spain

How do we express this idea in english?
 
Hi everybody,
 
This afternoon one of my students asked me about the word used to call someone who always feels it is cold, even though it isn īt. I think this adjective is not lexicalized in English as it is in Spanish "friolero". How can we express this Spanish adjective without using a long sentence?
 
Thanks in advance.

4 May 2011      



Mariethe House
France

What I heard in England was:"I feel the cold" , No adjective like in french or in Spanish.

4 May 2011     



spinney
United Kingdom

The word you īre looking for is "Andalusian." (Joke)

4 May 2011     



Aldegunde
Spain

I have heard the adjective "cold-natured" used in the sense of "friolero". I hope it helps.

4 May 2011     



yanogator
United States

Sometimes in the US, people jokingly use the term cold-blooded. Here, cold-natured refers to the personality. Mostly, we say "She is always cold". We don īt have an adjective for it.
 
Bruce

4 May 2011     



jpinero
Spain

Hi,
Sensitive to cold is the expression you are looking for.
I also found on wordreference.com: Nesh is an English dialect adjective meaning unusually susceptible to cold weather and there is no synonym for this use. Usage has been recorded in Staffordshire, the East Midlands, Lancashire, South Yorkshire and Shropshire.
I think shivery is also used in literature. Not very sure about its use for people in colloquial English. Maybe a native speaker could help.
Cold-natured is alsoused in American English.
Best wishes

4 May 2011     



yanogator
United States

"Sensitive to cold" means the person is bothered by the cold, but David is asking about people who feel cold all the time, even when the environment isn īt cold.
 
Bruce

4 May 2011     



almaz
United Kingdom

There īs a lovely old Scottish adjective, cauldrif (more often cauldrifit nowadays) which you can still hear on the streets, meaning susceptible to cold. For some of our more fundamentalist Presbyterian kindred, it can also mean īlacking in religious zeal ī.

4 May 2011     



Jackie1952
Spain

Well I am one of those brought up in an area of England that uses the dialect mentioned above.

I`m always using the word "nesh" as in the Spanish "friolero"..................it`s a very handy adjective, and it certianly DOES mean someone who feels the cold all the time.

e.g "You are SO nesh...............it`s not THAT cold today"

Jackie

4 May 2011     



jpinero
Spain

Hi again,

Sorry Bruce but maybe spinney was right, the word chenchen castrourdiales is looking for is probably "Andalusian".
"Friolero" means:  Muy sensible al frío (very sensitive to cold) accordig to RAE. So I think either we have a lexical problem with the concept or we are just talking about an exaggeration here.

Jose

4 May 2011     



spinney
United Kingdom

It īs most definitely a culture thing rather than a language thing, hence the joke about Andalusian. I īm intrigued about this "nesh" word. It sounds familiar. Is it Northeast England?
Iīve also heard "cold-blooded" used this way, too.

5 May 2011     

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