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ESL forum > Ask for help > NATIVE SPEAKERS PLEASE : WILL-GOING TO---WHEN-WHILE    

NATIVE SPEAKERS PLEASE : WILL-GOING TO---WHEN-WHILE



ss73
Turkey

NATIVE SPEAKERS PLEASE : WILL-GOING TO---WHEN-WHILE
 
I need the help of English and American native speakers, please...
 
 
 
1. What do you think about teaching the difference of WILL and GOING TO to students and to test this difference?
Do you think it is realistic/common  among native speakers of English?
 
2. What do you think about the uses of WHEN and WHILE?
As far as I know there isn īt difference that is worth teaching it? Both can be possible with past and past continuous??!?
 
thanks in advance and happy new year:))
 

22 Dec 2012      



mirela.sorina
Romania

going to - intention
will - promise, very firm

22 Dec 2012     



yanogator
United States

2.  When is much more common with simple past, and while is much more common with the continuous tenses. However, they can both be used in both situations without sounding strange, so you don īt have to differentiate between them.
 
The main difference is that "while" emphasizes the duration of the action, as do the continuous tenses. However, you don īt need to have both elements for the emphasis to be present.
 
I found this picture while I was looking through an album
I found this picture when I was looking through an album.
 
Both sound very natural with only a slight difference in emphasis.
 
Bruce

22 Dec 2012     



[email protected]
Japan

As Bruce (yanogator) said, but I would like to add:

If you don īt teach them, and so your students don īt learn them (from you), they might feel that they do not understand if spoken to by an English speaker. There is no harm in a short "English speakers also say..." addition to your lesson for 5 minutes.

22 Dec 2012