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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > Relative Pronouns    

Relative Pronouns



ronit85
Israel

Relative Pronouns
 
Hello to all of you,
Can you please help me with adding a relative pronoun to the following sentence and tell me why it is used.
Sara and I both of ____________ are your sisters, love you .
Thanks and have a wonderful day
Ronit 
 
 

1 Dec 2015      



LadySaratoga
Philippines

Sara and I, who are both your sisters, love you.

 Who should be put AFTER the subjects, Sara and I  to make it clear which person or thing you are talking about.

1 Dec 2015     



Homie67
France

Hi,
 
If you want to keep your sentence as it is, you need to use whom because it is complement of the preposition of. Not which because the subject is human; not who because it would sound too strange...and grammatically incorrect.
 
Sara and I, both of whom are your sisters, love you.
 

1 Dec 2015     



mjpa
Spain

I agree with Homie 67: both of whom. (object pronoun)

1 Dec 2015     



Tapioca
United Kingdom

The trouble is that if the elicited answer is
 
´Sara and I, both of whom are your sisters, love you. ´
 
then, as Homie showed, you also need to add the comma.
 
The bigger trouble is that this is a pretty weird sentence. "Wait, you are my sisters?? How come I didn ´t know that??"
 
In real life we ´d be more likely to say: "Look, Sara and I are your sisters. We love you." If my sister started using ´whom ´ with me I ´d think she ´d taken the wrong pills.
 
If you wanted to teach ´both of whom ´ then I recommend getting some examples from this very interesting article about the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy. Your students might learn how to use ´whom ´, you can find some real life examples and everyone can learn a very important lesson about correlation and causation which will make them much smarter people. :-)
 
Some students (perhaps depending on their mother tongue) find learning the correct use of ´whom ´ pretty difficult. That ´s understandable because I would guess most native speakers don ´t know how to use it either (the exception includes teachers, before you throw anything at me!). To be honest I don ´t think I ever teach it because it ´s a) so rarely used, and b) causes grammatical panic attacks.
 
There ´s a fantastic Oatmeal explainer on this by the way, if anyone is interested. The image below is just the beginning of it.
 
 
 

1 Dec 2015     



Homie67
France

Pretty clear :)
I don ´t teach it either, as it isn ´t really used in oral speech.
 

1 Dec 2015     



ronit85
Israel

Thanks to all of you!
I too found this sentence strange but as it was part of an exercise in my pupil ´s book I tried to find an answer.
 

1 Dec 2015