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ESL forum > Ask for help > Heeeeeelp!!!!!!!!    

Heeeeeelp!!!!!!!!



Mar (itxasobcn)
Spain

Heeeeeelp!!!!!!!!
 
Which is the correct option?
 
1-John s gone to the dentist. He has had trouble with a tooth. or
 
2-John s gone to the dentist. He has been having trouble with a tooth.
 
And the same: another sentence with HAVE.
 
-Our neighbours have had a row all day or have been having a row all day?
 
I d say BEEN HAVING but I m not sure.
 
Thanks very much!!!!!
 
MAR

11 Mar 2009      



mokus19
Hungary

there is a difference in the meaning:
He has had trouble with a tooth. (= maybe he is still at the dentist and the dentist is curing his tooth, but his tooth doesn t ache anymore)
or
He has been having trouble with a tooth. (= he had trouble with his tooth and he will have trouble with his teeth in the future)

Our neighbours have had a row all day. ( =they finished now, but perhaps they are still angry with each other)
Our neighbours have been having a row all day. (= they are still doing it, maybe you can hear them)

11 Mar 2009     



douglas
United States

I agree with mokus- has/have had indicate that the situation has come to an end.
 
Has been/have been having--it is still an issue.

11 Mar 2009     



BRAHIM S
France

Dear Mokus
I am afraid  I cannot agree with you
For the first 2 sentences, "he s gone to the dentist" alone is enough to clearly imply that he is still at the dentist, otherwise it should be  "he s been" to mean he is back
The difference between has had and has been having rather has has to do with duration,  I can say both could be correct. Youcan use the progressive from  to insist on the idea that it s been painful, it has been aching him SO FAR, as to the future, however,  we don t know

As to the second example,  I really think the progressive form  is far much better given the phrase "all day", it has been non stop, which is good reason to insist on continuity, duration

This is the point of view of a non native teacher

Hope it helps

11 Mar 2009     



source
Turkey

Heeeeeelp!!!!!!!!
 
Which is the correct option?
 
1-John s gone to the dentist. He has had trouble with a tooth. or
 
2-John s gone to the dentist. He has been having trouble with a tooth.
 
And the same: another sentence with HAVE.
 
-Our neighbours have had a row all day or have been having a row all day?
 
I d say BEEN HAVING but I m not sure.
 
Thanks very much!!!!!
dear my friends....
 
in the second sentence 2-John s gone to the dentist. He has been having trouble with a tooth.
 
we expect some expressions such as : for 2 hours or since the morning
 
 
and the other one have been having a row all day is better...I suppose...

11 Mar 2009     



alien boy
Japan

As Douglas has said, it depends on whether the situation is continuing or has completed.

1. John has had trouble with a tooth - he may have had one or more problems but it is not being a problem right now, but will probably cause problems again;
2. has been having trouble with a tooth - He has had problems & the problems are continuing as we speak / at this moment so he has gone to the dentist.

Have had a row - the row has had some resolution - maybe a screaming match or letting bygones be bygones . The row may continue later, but it is currently resolved.

Have been having a row - the row has been going on in the past and has not been resolved. It will probably continue.

To ascertain which is the correct statement it depends on the context of the statements & on the criteria that you use to judge which is appropriate. There may be no need to express more specific duration as the statements themselves tell you whether or not the problem/row is current or in the past.

Cheers,
AB

11 Mar 2009     



Mar (itxasobcn)
Spain

THANKS VERY MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
HUGS,
 
MAR

11 Mar 2009