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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > Impact/ impact on    

Impact/ impact on



aura+
Portugal

Impact/ impact on
 
Hi, everyone!
 
Which of these sentences is correct?
 
a. Our actions impact on the environment?
b. Our actions impact the environment?
 
 
 
Thanks!
 
 
 

14 May 2019      



cunliffe
United Kingdom

Usually, actions have an impact on something and they impact something. So, go for b. Our actions impact the environment. 

14 May 2019     



aura+
Portugal

Thanks!
 

14 May 2019     



almaz
United Kingdom

When you´re using the verb figuratively and intransitively (how one thing may have a pronounced effect or influence on something else), the preposition is commonly used. Nothing terribly wrong with using it transitively either. It´s really a matter of preference – and style.
 
Incidentally, if anyone whinges on about ´impact´ being an egregious example of verbing (a regular complaint from the language peevers and sticklerati), tell ´em it was a verb long before it was a noun. 

15 May 2019     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

I love verbing. My favourite, and I´m sure it´s very long-standing, is ´to eye´. It conjures up wonderful images. Or terrifying. In the news this morning: ´BoJo eyes No.10.´ Or ´to eyeball. ´Larry eyeballs his rival Gladstone´. Hilarious! 
(Larry is the No.10 Downing Street cat and Gladstone is another cat. BoJo is Boris Johnson, a rather colourful politician/comedian)) 

17 May 2019     



almaz
United Kingdom

Aye, it´s pretty long-standing. It certainly popped up in the Tyndale Bible:
 
"Whosoever eyeth a wyfe, lustynge affter her, hathe committed advoutrie with her alredy in his hert."

17 May 2019     



spinney
United Kingdom

P G Wodehouse loved to do it, too. 
 
 
  • "It was, indeed, practically with a merry tra-la-la on my lips that I latchkeyed my way in and made for the sitting room."
    (P.G. Wodehouse, The Code of the Woosters, 1938)
  • "To trouser it was with me the work of an instant;  to reach the window with a view to the quick getaway that of an instant more"
  • (The Mating Season)

 

17 May 2019     



Aisha77
Spain

Isn´t English enough difficult to start verbing? Hehehhe 
I was shocked when I knew English has more than 700.000 entries! Imagine, we would never learn even half of those!
Spanish has only  88.000 and I assure you I don´t know a quarter of them! This is  the "never-ending story!" The more I know, the more I realise I actually don´t know! 
Dale: What could "to trouser" mean? I cannot figure it out...
 

17 May 2019     



ldthemagicman
United Kingdom

Aisha:
 
"To trouser" something, means to put it in your trouser pocket ... to "pocket it".
 
I imagine that the speaker had stolen something which he wanted, and was now making his speedy get-away.

"When I give you the £10 note, trouser it immediately in your deepest pocket. There are lots of pick-pockets in this locality." 
 
Les Douglas 

17 May 2019     



Aisha77
Spain

Thanks, Less, very kind of you. 

18 May 2019