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ESL forum > Ask for help > Games with numbers...    

Games with numbers...



morganalin
Portugal

Games with numbers...
 

Hi dear colleagues, how do you do?

I need your suggestions...
I īm teaching English to an adults class and I īm going to teach them the numbers next week. How kind of games can I do with them?
We know that we can īt teach them the same way we teach children,we need to motivate and captivate them. What do you suggest me?Ermm
 
Have a nice day, evening, night...
 
HugsHug
 
Morganalin

25 Mar 2009      



Ivona
Serbia

Some adults find it hard to differentiate between numbers ending in -ty and those ending in -teen. What i do is remind them who TEENagers are (13-19) and i make them count, stressing both THIR- and -TEEN (we move left and right, teen being stronger).
As to the -ty numbers, i remind them of the phrase we use here (with the borrowed English words) "let īs share it fifty-fifty", so it īs easier for them to remember when to use both of the endings.

You can do a listening activity. They move to the left every time they hear a -TY number, or to the right when they hear a -TEEN number. Make sure you do it faster and faster, to make it fun. Instead of moving, they could do other things, like clap and make a kissing sound, or ... It depends on the profile of the people you īre teaching.

EDIT: Hmmmm degofe, i like your suggestions ... until you decided to remove your post ... maybe youÂīre just editing.

25 Mar 2009     



degofe
Portugal

If your class consists of men you could use a football league team ranking to teach both cardinals and ordinals. show them pictures of players or team symbols.  you can also use an old top 50 music singles chart from the time they were teenagers. Play parts of the songs so that they can guess the author.
For women try prices of goods, make up, clothes... so that you can introduce hundreds, thousands... tell correct prices and wrong prices, they will have to guess the right one.
try dates of special events (their wedding day and year, the day their children were born)...  Search for important phone numbers in your area (Police station, hospital, school...) and use a matching exercise or a listening exercise.
talk about heights and weights to revise personal description structures... bring a scale to your class so that they can see and say how much they weigh.
do a survey on a specific topic and calculate totals of answers, statistics,...

25 Mar 2009     



degofe
Portugal

sorry for my messy ideas but I īm not feeling OK today...
 
Ivona, thanks for your idea. As my students need some physical exercise, I will use it tonight on a different topic with true and false (instead of -ty and -teen).  

25 Mar 2009     



Ivona
Serbia

The listening activity can be adapted to ANY īcontrast ī exercise.
e.g. LEFT (every day) v RIGHT (now)
He goes to school (move left). She doesn īt eat macaroni (move left). She īs eating pizza (move right).
I ask the students to say the adverbials while moving left or right. OR they could say whole sentences.
A/AN (Apple, Banana, Orange, Elephant, Cheese, etc), THERE IS/ARE (a boy, a table, treeS, appleS, etc.), HAVE GOT/HAS GOT, FEMALE/MALE words ... You can do ANYthing with it.

25 Mar 2009     



puspita
Indonesia

Other thing you can do to complement Ivona īs activities (may I, Ivona?), is that you write the words in pairs on small pieces of paper to be read by students one by one. They must choose which of the pairs they want to read -- this serves as a check point. This way, you can also check their pronunciation. 
And if you have time and the book (pronunciation games by Mark Hancock), use pronunciation journey with this game.  I can send the page if you need it (only this page, though).

25 Mar 2009     



Ivona
Serbia

Puspita, i īm not sure i understand your activity. Could you, please, give an example?

25 Mar 2009     



morganalin
Portugal

I have both men and women in my class...
 
Thanks a lot for your suggestions, they īll be useful.

25 Mar 2009     



douglas
United States

 
 
Hi Morgana,
 
What I found useful for teaching adult true beginners numbers was to tie it in with learning the weekdays.  I put a big calendar (1 Month) on the board and ask questions like  "What day is 13 March?" or point to a day and they would tell me the date "Friday, March 13th"
 
Ivona is right about confusing (and mis-pronouncing)the -ty and -teen endings and it is very important that they get those right.  I usually tell them to emphasis the -teen and not the -ty  (thir-TEEN;  thir-ty) it seems to work pretty well and they ARE getting better.
 
Douglas

25 Mar 2009     



puspita
Indonesia

Hi Ivona, there īs a page in Hancock īs about pronunciation journey. This activity deals with pronunciation pairs (van vs pan, shell vs sell... etc). Rather than moving left (van) or right (pan), students are tracing routes from city to city.  The way they pronounce the words will determine which city they would have to go.

For example, this is what they see on the paper:
                                                                     Jakarta
                                                            _______|_______
                                                           |                             |
                                            Kuala Lumpur                   Sydney
                                           ______|_______              ______|_______
                                          |                           |            |                          |
                                   Tokyo                New Delhi    Frankfurt            Rome

The teacher prepares slips of paper with the pair (van - pan, shell - sell). One student take a slip, circle a word,  then read it out loud (example: van). The rest of the class have to decide where to go from Jakarta (in this case: Kuala Lumpur -- or LEFT, as in your activity). Next student come and get a new slip, circle a word, then read it out loud again (example: sell). The rest of the class then will move to New Delhi (as to RIGHT in your activity). So on, until there īs no more slips; the students have reached the destination.
To find out whether students aren īt lost, teacher has to collect all slips, in correct order, and check all circled words; thus pronunciation is also checked. With numbers, left and right applies to the pronunciation of ī-teen ī and ī-ty ī. Hopefully this is helpful.

cheers,
pus 
                          

25 Mar 2009     



Ivona
Serbia

Hmmm ... sounds like good treasure hunt of some sort ... but what i don īt understand is this: how do the students know whether the student read the word that is LEFT or RIGHT? i mean, do the others have sets of pairs? ... something is missing in your explanation, or i īm too tired tonight to cop on more quickly ... Unhappy

25 Mar 2009     

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