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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > ´on ´ or ´upon ´    

´on ´ or ´upon ´



vikral
India

´on ´ or ´upon ´
 
Hi

Can you please tell me the difference in the use of prepositions ´on ´ and ´upon ´? Thanks in advance. Have a nice day.

Regards
Vikral

15 Apr 2011      



Redbull
Thailand

Dear Vikral,

On/upon and in/into are equally interchangeable........ here are some examples.

(1) Upon receiving your check for $100 dollars. I ´m writing to say thank you.

(2) on receiving your check for $100 dollars. I ´m writing to say thank you.

SAME with in/into.

(1) Go in the house now for some tea.

(2) Go into the house now for some tea.

so you see you can use both of these words for the same sentence.

REDBULL GIVES YOU WINGS YOU KNOWWink.

15 Apr 2011     



Apodo
Australia

Most people would just use ´on ´.  Upon is quite dated & considered old fashioned. Many children ´s fairy stories begin ´Once upon a time.... ´. You can ´t say ´Once on a time... ´
 
Actually I don´t quite agree with Redbull´s suggested usage of on receiving - it´s used more for future actions and it is quite formal.
 
On receiving your cheque, I will forward a receipt.
 
And there is a subtle difference in the way a native would use in and into.

15 Apr 2011     



dawnmain
United Kingdom

into is a preposition of movement not place and requires a verb

He ran into the park.
and
He ran in the park.
have two completely different meanings.

15 Apr 2011     



Redbull
Thailand

Dear Apodo,

Sorry but the word upon is very much used to this day in England and it ´s more formal to use for the business use not on.

Example:

Upon receiving your letter I have now come to the conclusions you still owe us $100 Dollars please pay, immediately.

No way would you use on for a business letter or very important letters to clients.
Unless you want to make it informal for your letter writing.

Just my two pennies worthWink.

REDBULL GIVES YOU WINGS YOU KNOWWink.

15 Apr 2011     



Redbull
Thailand

Dear Dawunmian,

Please check these websites for

On or Upon?/In or Into?

On/upon and in/into are equally interchangeable according to the Merriam-Webster ´s Dictionary of English Usage and the oxford.

HERE  AND THE CAMBRIDGE DICTIONARY SAYS INTO DAYS USAGE THEY CAN BE INTERCHANGEABLE..............
EXAMPLE:
Teacher: you can now "log into"logon,login your computers......
The correct terms are "log in" or "log on." One can find instances of computer writers using "logon" and "login" as one word.

As to why these uses are correct and "log into" isn ´t — basically correct but can be used with todays language, it is a matter of usage. Speakers and writers over the past 50 years or so have established "log in" as the phrase.

But words are changing everyday and thier use also are changing everyday Dawunmian.
So the in/into now can be at times, used for interchangeable sentences.

REDBULL GIVES YOU WINGS YOU KNOWWink.

 

15 Apr 2011     



Apodo
Australia

OK. Agreed Upon can be used for legal or formal letters.

I commented on/ disagreed with this: Upon/on receiving your cheque I am writing to say thank you.
 
Edit:
Ahh! USAGE that´s the thing.
 
Would you say ´ I was sitting upon the sofa watching TV.´?
or
´I was sitting on the sofa watching TV.´  ????
 
I´ve never heard a modern child use upon in this way. If you read upon it means the same as on, but that doesn´t make them interchangeable in all cases.

15 Apr 2011     



Redbull
Thailand

Apodo correct me if i ´m wrong please.

BUT!

The usage I commented on was : Upon/on receiving your cheque I am writing to say thank you.

IF THIS SENTENCE WAS USED IN THE BUSINESS FIELD YOU WOULD USE UPON RIGHT?

REDBULL GIVES YOU WINGS YOU KNOWWink.

15 Apr 2011     



Apodo
Australia

@Redbull:
No. That sentence sounds really odd because you have used present continuous after on receiving rather than future. It means When we receive...
Also it is a mixture of formal and informal language.
 
 
A membership card will only be issued upon receipt of full payment.
(receipt rather than receiving for formal letters)
 
On receiving your deposit we will forward confirmation of your booking.
 
I am writing to say thank you for the birthday card. I received it yesterday.
 
 

15 Apr 2011     



Redbull
Thailand

Dear Apodo,

On/upon and in/into are equally interchangeable but yes sometimes they don ´t go together it all depends on the sentence you are using.

And I would say I was sitting on the sofa watching TV. Not upon. so yes some sentences you can ´t interchange.

But why are we getting soooooooo finicky and full of trivial detail; with overelaborate details?

15 Apr 2011     



dawnmain
United Kingdom

Dear redbull


You misunderstand.

quite clearly ´the man is in the car ´ is correct and ´the man is into the car? in wrong.

you can use in as a preposition of movement but you cant use into as a preposition of place.


15 Apr 2011     

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