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ESL forum > Ask for help > your help is wanted )))    

your help is wanted )))



sadbird
Belarus

your help is wanted )))
 

Good afternoon dear colleagues. I hope you all are doing well and having a good time. However teachers are always working, even in summer. )

Will you help me please with prepositions? I am at a loss… I’d like to take my guitar *on board a submarine/ into a submarine*. Which one is correct and sounds better in English? Or, maybe, there are some other ways to express the same idea?

Thank you in advance )

8 Aug 2019      



jfaraujo
Portugal

Hi!
I think onboard is the correct expression. 
Maybe a native speaker can be of more help. 

8 Aug 2019     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

I thought it might be ´into´ but my husband says ´on board´. I think, probably, he and jfaraujo are right. An interesting one. 

9 Aug 2019     



sadbird
Belarus

Thank you very much for your answers

9 Aug 2019     



yanogator
United States

You could also say "onto", but "on board" is the best choice.
 
Bruce 

11 Aug 2019     



sadbird
Belarus

Thanks a million. Prepositions in English always make me feel embarrassed and confused. Is there any way to learn how to use them properly? I guess it is something beyond my capabilities. :) I have come across a sentence in a test on the usage of prepositions. �To start with, the return flight was delayed ... two days but it didn�t upset me.� Options were �for, until, in, and no prepositions. I was sure it should be FOR. But the key said �delayed two days with no prepositions�. I supposed this one is a kind of an idiom. But neither Longman nor Oxford dictionary had such an expression. So I am in two minds: was there a mistake in the keys or this expression is a real one?.

12 Aug 2019     



redcamarocruiser
United States

The flight was delayed two days is correct.

12 Aug 2019     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

I would have said for or by. I found many examples of �flight was delayed for two hours etc... Is it a British/American thing?

13 Aug 2019     



sadbird
Belarus

May be it is about the meaning... I mean when we use FOR we focus on days. But when we say was delayed two days we emphasize than it just was delayed. I am not sure, but it is the only explanation I can think of.

13 Aug 2019     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

 
Found this - I agree with e2efour. However, I think all 3, for, by and no article are acceptable. I�m not keen on no article though, and that�s why I wondered if it was American usage. 

13 Aug 2019     



sadbird
Belarus

As far as I understand all options are possible especially in spoken language. But when we take part in some contests, write tests or sit exams, we have to refer to some reliable issues or dictionaries. If there are some, I ´d love to read the explanation or examples. Thank you so much for your support, dear colleagues. I am really grateful for all your posts. It is a good opportunity to learn English with such experienced teachers! :)

13 Aug 2019     

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